Criminal Convictions Policy

Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle (PHV) Licensing

1. Introduction

1.1 The purpose of this policy is to provide guidance on the criteria taken into account by the council when determining whether or not an applicant or an existing licence holder is a fit and proper person to hold a hackney carriage and/or private hire driver or operator licence.

1.2 The overriding aim of the licensing authority is to protect the safety of the public. The licensing authority is concerned to ensure:

  • That the person does not pose a threat to the public
  • That the public are safeguarded from dishonest person
  • The safeguarding of children and young persons

1.3 This policy provides guidance to any person with an interest in taxi and private hire licensing. In particular, but not exclusively:

  • Applicants for drivers’ and operators’ licences
  • Existing licensed drivers and operators whose licences are being reviewed
  • Licensing officers
  • Members of the licensing committee/ panel (or other relevant decision making body)
  • Magistrates hearing appeals against local authority decisions

1.4 Where licensing officers have delegated powers to grant licences, they will utilise these guidelines when making a decision to grant a licence. In all other cases applications for licences will be referred to the licensing committee/panel (or other relevant decision-making body) who will also utilise these guidelines. Whilst officers and the committee/panel will have regard to the guidelines contained in the policy, each case will be considered on its individual merits and, where the circumstances demand, the committee/officer may depart from the guidelines.

2. General policy

2.1 There may be occasions where it is appropriate to depart from the guidelines, for example where the offence is a one-off occasion or there are mitigating circumstances or alternatively where there are many or continuous offences which may show a pattern of offending and unfitness.

2.2 A person with a conviction for a serious offence need not be automatically barred from obtaining a licence, but would normally be expected to:

a. Remain free of conviction for an appropriate period; and

b. Show adequate evidence that he or she is a fit and proper person to hold a licence (the onus is on the applicant to produce such evidence). Simply remaining free of conviction may not generally be regarded as adequate evidence that a person is a fit and proper person to hold a licence.

2.3 Where an applicant has been convicted of a criminal offence, the licensing authority cannot review the merits of the conviction [Nottingham City Council v. Mohammed Farooq (1998)].

3. Appeals

3.1 Any applicant refused a driver or operator’s licence on the grounds that the licensing authority is not satisfied he is a fit and proper person to hold such a licence has a right to appeal to the Magistrates’ Court within 21 days of the notice of refusal [Local Government Miscellaneous Provisions Act 1976, s 77 (1)].

4. Powers

4.1 Section 61 of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976 allows the licensing authority to suspend, revoke or refuse to renew a driver’s licence if the applicant/licence holder has been convicted of an offence involving dishonesty, indecency, violence; failure to comply with the provisions of the Town Police Clauses Act 1847; failure to comply with the provisions of Part II of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976; or any other reasonable cause.

4.2 Section 62 of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976 allows the licensing authority to suspend, revoke or refuse to renew an operator’s licence: if the applicant/licence holder has been convicted of any offence under, or none compliance with Part II of the Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976; or any conduct on the part of the operator which appears to render him unfit to hold an operators licence; or any material change since the licence was granted in any of the circumstances of the operator on the basis of which the licence was granted; or any other reasonable cause.

4.3 The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions)(Amendment) Order 2002, allows the licensing authority to take into account all convictions recorded against an applicant or the holder of a private hire vehicle or hackney carriage driver’s licence, whether spent or not. Therefore the licensing authority will have regard to all relevant convictions, particularly where there is a long history of offending or a recent pattern of repeat offending.

4.4 In this policy the term “disqualification” refers to the period served, in order to take account of the fact that a court may reduce the period of disqualification from driving. An applicant must provide evidence, in advance, to prove that any action required to be undertaken as part of a court agreed reduction in the period of disqualification has been successfully completed.

5. Consideration of disclosed criminal history

5.1 Under the provisions of Sections 51, 55, and 59, Local Government (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1976, the licensing authority is required to ensure that an applicant for the grant or renewal of a hackney carriage and/or a private hire vehicle driver’s licence and/or private hire vehicle operator’s licence is a ‘fit and proper’ person to hold such a licence. However, if an applicant has any convictions, warnings, cautions or charges awaiting trail, the licensing authority will look into:

  • How relevant the offence(s) are to the licence being applied for
  • How serious the offence(s) were
  • When the offence(s) were committed
  • The date of conviction
  • Circumstances of the individual concerned
  • Sentence imposed by the court
  • The applicant’s age at the time of conviction
  • Whether they form part of a pattern of offending
  • Any other character check considered reasonable (e.g. personal references)
  • Any other factors that might be relevant

5.2 Existing holders of drivers’ licences are required to notify the licensing authority in writing within twenty-eight days of receiving a driving licence endorsement, fixed penalty notice or criminal conviction (including cautions).

5.3 Applicants can discuss further what effect a caution/conviction may have on any application by contacting the licensing section in confidence for advice.

5.4 The licensing authority conducts enhanced disclosures from the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) of any applicant for a driver licence. The licensing authority follows the CRB’s Code of Practice on the fair use of disclosure information. A copy is available on request.

5.5 Applicants applying for the grant or a renewal of a drivers’ licence will be required to obtain an enhanced disclosure at their expense. The licensing authority abides by the CRB’s Policy on the secure storage, handling, use, retention and disposal of disclosure information, which is available on request.

5.6 More information about the CRB can be found on their website at www.disclosure.gov.uk.

5.7 The licensing authority is also entitled to use other records and information that may be available to it in determining applications or an entitlement to continue holding a licence. This may include information held by the licensing authority or other licensing authorities, and information disclosed by the police under the Home Office scheme for reporting offences committed by notifiable occupations.

5.8 It is an offence for any person knowingly or recklessly to make a false declaration or to omit any material particular in giving information required by the application for a licence. Where an applicant has made a false statement or a false declaration on their application for the grant or renewal of a licence, the licence will normally be refused.

6 Serious offences involving violence

6.1 Licensed drivers have close regular contact with the public. A firm line is to be taken with those who have convictions for offences involving violence. An application will normally be refused if the applicant has a conviction for an offence that involved the loss of life.

6.2 In other cases anyone of a violent disposition will normally be refused to be licensed until a period free of conviction in accordance with the following paragraphs. However, given the range of the offences that involve violence, consideration must be given to the nature of the conviction.

6.3 Unless there are exceptional circumstances a licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has a conviction for an offence such as:

  • Murder
  • Manslaughter
  • Manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving
  • Terrorism offences
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

6.4 A licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has a conviction for an offence or similar offence(s) which replace the offences below and the conviction is less than 10 years prior to the date of application:

  • Arson
  • Malicious wounding or grievous bodily harm which is racially aggravated
  • Actual bodily harm which is racially aggravated
  • Grievous bodily harm with intent
  • Robbery
  • Possession of firearm
  • Riot
  • Assault Police
  • Common assault with racially aggravated
  • Violent disorder
  • Resisting arrest
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

6.5 A licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has a conviction for an offence or similar offence(s) which replace the offences below and the conviction is less than 5 years prior to the date of application:

  • Racially-aggravated criminal damage
  • Racially-aggravated offence
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

6.6 A licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has a conviction for an offence or similar offence(s) which replace the offences below and the conviction is less than 3 years prior to the date of application:

  • Common assault
  • Assault occasioning actual bodily harm
  • Affray
  • S5 Public Order Act 1986 offence (harassment, alarm or distress)
  • S.4 Public Order Act 1986 offence (fear of provocation of violence)
  • S4A Public Order Act 1986 offence (intentional harassment, alarm or distress)
  • Obstruction
  • Criminal damage
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

6.7 A licence will not normally be granted if an applicant has more than one conviction in the last 10 years for an offence of a violent nature.

6.8 In the event of a licence being granted, a strict warning both verbally and in writing should be administered.

7. Possession of a weapon

7.1 If an applicant has been convicted of possession of a weapon or any other weapon related offence, this will give serious concern as to whether the person is fit to carry the public.

7.2 Depending on the circumstances of the offence, an applicant should be free of conviction for 3 years (or at least 3 years must have passed since the completion of the sentence, whichever is longer), before a licence is granted.

8. Sex and indecency offences

8.1 As licensed drivers often carry unaccompanied and vulnerable passengers, applicants with convictions for sexual offences must be closely scrutinised. Those with convictions for the more serious sexual offences will generally be refused. For other offences, applicants will be expected to show a substantial period (normally at least 5 years) free of conviction for such offences before a licence will be granted.

8.2 (a) Unless there are exceptional circumstances, an application will normally be refused where the applicant has a conviction for an offence such as:

  • Rape
  • Assault by penetration
  • Offences involving children or vulnerable adults
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

8.3 (b) Before an application is allowed, an applicant should be free of conviction for at least 10 years (or at least 3 years must have passed since the completion of the sentence, whichever is longer), if he/she has a conviction for an offence such as:

  • Sexual assault
  • Indecent assault
  • Possession of indecent photographs, child pornography etc.
  • Exploitation of prostitution
  • Trafficking for sexual exploitation
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

8.4 (c) Before a licence is granted, an applicant should be free of conviction for at least 3 years (or at least 3 years must have passed since the completion of the sentence, whichever is longer), if he/she has a conviction for an offence such as:

  • Indecent exposure
  • Soliciting (kerb crawling)
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

8.5 In addition to the above the licensing authority will not normally grant a licence to any applicant who is currently on the Sex Offenders Register.

8.6 A licence will not normally be granted if an applicant has more than one conviction for a sex or indecency offence.

9. Dishonesty

9.1 A licensed PHV or taxi driver is expected to be a trustworthy person. They deal with cash transactions and valuable property may be left in their vehicles. Taxi drivers are required to deposit such property with police within 24 hours. PHV drivers must pass lost property to the operator. The widespread practice of delivering unaccompanied property is indicative of the trust that business people place in licensed drivers. Moreover, it is comparatively easy for a dishonest driver to defraud the public by demanding more than the legal or agreed fare, etc. Overseas visitors can be confused by our currency and may be vulnerable to an unscrupulous driver. For all these reasons, a serious view is taken of any conviction involving dishonesty.

9.2 In general, a minimum period of 3 years free of conviction or at least 3 years from completion of sentence (whichever is longer) should be required before granting a licence. Offences involving dishonesty include:

  • theft
  • burglary
  • fraud
  • benefit fraud
  • handling or receiving stolen goods
  • forgery
  • conspiracy to defraud
  • obtaining money or property by deception
  • other deception
  • taking a vehicle without consent
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

10. Drugs

10.1 A serious view is taken of any drug related offence. The nature and quantity of the drugs, whether for personal use or supply are issues which should be considered.

10.2 A licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has a conviction for an offence related to the supply of drugs and has not been free of conviction for 5 years.

10.3 A licence will not normally be granted where the applicant has more than one conviction for offences related to the possession of drugs and has not been free of conviction for 5 years.

10.4 An application from an applicant who has an isolated conviction for an offence related to the possession of drugs within the last 3-5 years may be granted a licence, but consideration should be given to the nature and quantity of the drugs.

10.5 If there is evidence of persistent drugs use, misuse or dependency a specialist medical examination (in accordance with DVLA Group 2 medical standards) may be required before the licence is granted. If the applicant was an addict then they would normally be required to show evidence of 5 years free from drug taking after detoxification treatment.

11 Driving offences involving the loss of life

11.1 A very serious view is to be taken of any applicant who has been convicted of a driving offence that resulted in the loss of life.

A licence will not normally be granted unless the applicant is free of conviction for 7 years or (or at least 3 years must have passed since the completion of the sentence, whichever is longer) if he has a conviction for:

  • Causing death by dangerous driving
  • Causing death by careless driving whilst under the influence of drink or drugs
  • Or any similar offences (including attempted or conspiracy to commit) offences which replace the above

11.2 Before a licence is granted, an applicant should be free of conviction for 3 years (or at least 3 years must have passed since the completion of the sentence, whichever is longer), if he has a conviction for:

  • Causing death by careless driving
  • Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers

12 Drink driving/driving under the influence of drugs

12.1 As licensees are professional vocational drivers, a serious view is taken of convictions for driving, or being in charge of a vehicle while under the influence of drink or drugs. An isolated incident would not necessarily debar an applicant from proceeding on the restoration of his DVLA driving licence but he should be warned as to the significant risk to his licence status in the event of re-offending. More than one conviction for these offences raises significant doubts as to the applicant’s fitness to drive the public. At least 3 years, after the restoration of the driving licence following a drink drive conviction should elapse before an application will be considered. If there is any suggestion that the applicant is alcohol or drug dependent, a satisfactory special medical report must be provided before the application can be allowed to proceed.

13 Outstanding charges or summonses

13.1 If the individual is the subject of an outstanding charge or summons their application can continue to be processed, but the application will need to be reviewed at the conclusion of proceedings. Where information is received through the Notifiable Occupations Scheme on existing licence holders, consideration will be made at committee.

13.2 If the outstanding charge or summons involves a serious offence and the individual’s conviction history indicates a possible pattern of unlawful behaviour or character trait, then in the interests of public safety the application may be put on hold until proceedings are concluded or the licence may be refused.

13.3 A suspension or revocation of the licence of a driver takes effect at the end of the period of 21 days beginning with the day on which notice is given to the driver. If it appears that the interests of public safety require the suspension or revocation of the licence to have immediate effect, and the notice given to the driver includes a statement that is so and an explanation why, the suspension or revocation takes effect when the notice is given to the driver. [Road Safety Act 2006, s 52, 2A&2B]

14 Non-conviction information

14.1 If an applicant has, on more than one occasion, been arrested or charged, but not convicted, for a serious offence which suggests he could be a danger to the public, consideration should be given to refusing the application. Such offences would include serious violent offences and serious sex offences.

14.2 In assessing the action to take, the safety of the travelling public must be the paramount concern.

15 Cautions

15.1 Admission of guilt is required before a caution can be issued. Every case will be considered on its own merits including the details and nature of the offence.

16 Licensing offences

16.1 Certain offences under taxi legislation such as plying for hire, overcharging and refusing to carry disabled persons would normally prevent a licence being granted or renewed until a period of 3 years has passed since .

17 Insurance offences

17.1 A serious view will be taken of convictions of driving or being in charge of a vehicle without insurance. An isolated incident in the past will not necessarily stop a licence being granted provided he/she has been free of conviction for 3 years, however strict warning should be given as to future behaviour. More than one conviction for these offences would normally prevent a licence being granted or renewed.

17.2 At least three years should elapse (after the restoration of the DVLA driving licence), before a licence would normally be granted for a hackney carriage or private hire driver’s licence. An operator found guilty of aiding and abetting the driving of passengers for hire and reward whilst without insurance will have his operator’s licence revoked immediately and prevented from holding a licence for three years.

18 Overseas residents

18.1 If a private hire driver or operator applicant has spent six continuous months or more overseas the licensing authority will expect to see evidence of a criminal record check from the country/countries covering the period, or in cases where criminal record checks are not available from the countries in question, a

Certificate of Good Conduct from the applicants embassy or consulate, with certified written English translation, will need to be provided.

19 Licences issued by other licensing authorities

19.1 Applicants who hold a licence with one licensing authority should not automatically assume that their application will be granted by another. Each case will be decided on its own merits.

20 Summary

20.1 To summarise, a criminal history in itself may not automatically result in refusal and a current conviction for a serious crime need not bar an applicant permanently from becoming licensed. As the preceding paragraphs indicate, in most cases, an applicant would be expected to remain free from conviction for 3 to 10 years, according to circumstances, before an application can be considered. However, there may be occasions when an application can be allowed before 3 years free from conviction have elapsed.

20.2 Any person who has committed an offence and has to wait before an application is positively considered is more likely to value their licence and act accordingly.

20.3 While it is possible that an applicant may have a number of convictions that, individually, meet the above guidelines, the overall offending history must be considered when assessing an applicant’s suitability to be licensed. A series of offences over a period of time is more likely to give cause for concern than an isolated minor conviction. Obviously some discretion can be afforded if an offence disclosed is isolated and there are mitigating circumstances, but the overriding consideration is the protection of the public.

Annex A – Motoring offences and penalty points

The following is a guide to the number of penalty points a court may impose, it does not reflect the fact that some offences may incur a disqualification. These codes are recorded from information supplied by the courts (accurate at the time of this document).

CodeOffencePenalty points
AC10 (Accident Offences) Failing to stop after an accident 5-10
AC20 (Accident Offences) Failing to give particulars or to report an accident within 24 hours 5-10
AC30 (Accident Offences) Undefined accident offences 4-9
BA10 (Disqualified Driver) Driving whilst disqualified by order of court 6
BA30 (Disqualified Driver) Attempting to driver while disqualified by order of court 6
CD10 (Careless Driving) Driving without due care and attention 3-9
CD20 (Careless Driving) Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users 3-9
CD30 (Careless Driving) Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users 3-9
CD40 (Careless Driving) Causing death through careless driving when unfit through drink 3-11
CD50 (Careless Driving) Causing death by careless driving when unfit through drugs 3-11
CD60 (Careless Driving) Causing death by careless driving with alcohol level above the limit 3-11
CD70 (Careless Driving) Causing death by careless driving then failing to supply a specimen for analysis 3-11
CD71 (Careless Driving) Causing death by careless driving then failing to supply A specimen for drug analysis 3-11
CD80 (Careless Driving) Causing death by careless, or inconsiderate, driving 3-11
CD90 (Careless Driving) Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or Uninsured drivers 3-11
CU10 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Using a vehicle with defective brakes 3
CU20 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of use of unsuitable vehicles or using a vehicle with parts or accessories (excluding brakes, steering or tyres) in a dangerous condition 3
CU30 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Using a vehicle with defective tyre(s) 3
CU40 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Using a vehicle with defective steering 3
CU50 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of load or passengers 3
C80 (Construction & Use Of Offences) Using a mobile phone while driving a vehicle 3
DD40 (Dangerous driving) Dangerous driving3-11
DD60 (Dangerous driving) Manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving a vehicle 3-11
DD90 (Dangerous driving)Furious driving3-9
DR10 (Drink or drugs) Driving or attempting to drive with alcohol level above limit 3-11
DR20 (Drink or drugs) Driving or attempting to drive while unfit through drink 3-11
DR30 (Drink or drugs) Driving or attempting to drive then failing to supply a specimen for analysis 3-11
DR40 (Drink or drugs) In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit 10
DR50 (Drink or drugs) In charge of vehicle while unfit through drink 10
DR60 (Drink or drugs) Failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive 10
DR61 (Drink or drugs) Failure to supply a specimen for drug analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive 10
DR70 (Drink or drugs) Failing to provide specimen for breath test 4
DR80 (Drink or drugs) Driving or attempting to drive when unfit through drugs 3-11
DR90 (Drink or drugs) In charge of a vehicle when unfit though drugs 3-11
IN10 (Insurance offences) Using a vehicle uninsured against third party risks 6-8
LC20 (Licensing offences ) Driving otherwise than in accordance with the licence 3-6
LC30 (Licensing offences ) Driving after making a false declaration about fitness applying for a licence 3-6
LC40 (Licensing offences ) Driving a vehicle having failed to notify a disability 3-6
LC50 (Licensing offences ) Driving after a licence has been revoked or refused on medical ground 3-6
MS10 (Miscellaneous offences) Leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position 3
MS20 (Miscellaneous offences) Unlawful pillion riding 3
MS30 (Miscellaneous offences) Play street offences 2
MS50 (Miscellaneous offences) Motor racing on the highway 3-11
MS60 (Miscellaneous offences) Offences not covered by other codes As appropriate
MS70 (Miscellaneous offences) Driving with uncorrected defective eyesight 3
MS80 (Miscellaneous offences) Refusing to submit to an eyesight test 3
MS90 (Miscellaneous offences) Failure to give information as to identity of driver etc 3
MW10 (Motorway offences) Contravention of Special Roads Regulations (excluding speed limits) 3
PC10 (Pedestrian crossing) Undefined Contravention of Pedestrian Crossing Regulation 3
PC20 Contravention of Pedestrian Crossing Regulations with moving vehicle 3
PC30 Contravention of Pedestrian Crossing Regulations with 3 Criminal Convictions Policy 040811.doc Page 13 of 14 stationary vehicle 3
SP10 (Speed limit) Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits 3-6
SP20 (Speed limit) Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles) 3-6
SP30 (Speed limit) Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road 3-6
SP40 (Speed limit) Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit 3-6
SP50 (Speed limit) Exceeding speed limit on a motorway 3-6
TS10 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with traffic light signals 3
TS20 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with double white lines 3
TS30 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with ‘Stop’ sign 3
TS40 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with direction of a constable/warden 3
TS50 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with a traffic sign (excluding stop signs, traffic signs or double white lines) 3
TS60 (Traffic directions and signs) Failing to comply with a school crossing patrol sign 3
TS70 (Traffic directions and signs) Undefined failure to comply with a traffic direction sign 3
TT99 (Special code) To signify a disqualification under totting-up procedure. If the total of penalty points reaches 12 or more within 3 Years, the driver is liable to be disqualified
UT50 (Theft or unauthorised taking) Aggravated taking of a vehicle 3-11

Aiding, abetting, counseling or procuring

Offences as coded, but with 0 changed to 2 e.g. LC10 becomes LC12.

Causing or permitting

Offences as coded, but with 0 changed to 4 e.g. LC10 becomes LC14.

Encouraging or assisting the commission of an offence (previously inciting)

Offences as coded, but with the end 0 changed to 6 e.g. DD40 becomes DD46.

Non-endorsable offences

Some offences are non-endorsable. A non-endorsable offence is an offence which courts do not endorse onto paper counterpart. No penalty points are attributed to these offences but they carry a period of disqualification. At the end of the disqualification (over 56 days) the driver will have to apply for a renewal licence together with the appropriate fee. Any queries about offences and endorsements should be directed to the convicting court.

Period of time

Periods of time are signified as follows: D=Days, M=Months, Y=Years

Endorsements remain on a counterpart licence for the following periods of time:

Endorsements must remain on a licence for 11 years from date of conviction if the offence is:

  • Drinking/drugs and driving (shown on the licence as DR10, DR20, DR20 and DR80).
  • Causing death by careless driving whilst under the influence of drink/drugs (shown on the licence as CD40, CD50 and CD 60).
  • Causing death buy careless driving, then failing to provide a specimen for analysis (shown on the licence as CD70).

Or 4 years from the date of conviction if the offence is as listed below:

  • Reckless/dangerous driving (shown on the licence as DD40, DD60 and DD80).
  • Offences resulting in disqualification.
  • Disqualified from holding a full licence until a driving test has been passed. Or 4 years from the date of offence in all other cases.

Source www.direct.gov.uk